Latest Updates: Feb 2017: Hypermobile Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome:Clinical Description and Natural History

Top experts on HEDS come together in this review article to describe what is known and understood so far about the cause, presentation and management of HEDS.

Hypermobile Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome Type III and Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type): Clinical Description and Natural History

Authors: BRAD TINKLE, MARCO CASTORI, BRITTA BERGLUND, HELEN COHEN, RODNEY GRAHAME, HANADI KAZKAZ, AND HOWARD LEVY

Am J Med Genet Part C Semin Med Genet 9999C:1–22.
Abstract: The hypermobile type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations—joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder.

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About Hypermobility Syndrome India/Viv

I an an Indian woman with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (EDS-HT), also known as joint hypermobility syndrome. Although I have "suffered" from this disease all my life, I was diagnosed at 38 years, 2 years after my child was born. My work mainly involves being a mom to my beautiful and compassionate child. I also write and work from home in the field of science. I aim to raise awareness about EDS-HT, chronic pain, invisible illnesses, mental illnesses and invisible disabilities through my blogs. Viv (Latin root, meaning Life/ Alive) is my blogging pseudonym and alludes to my continued endeavor to rediscover my life and its meaning.
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